HARTFORD RADIO HISTORY
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WTIC (AM)




On Sale Now!
Hartford Radio
Author: John Ramsey
ISBN: 9780738576664
# of Pages: 128
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing


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Book Description: 
Radio broadcasting has been an integral part of the history of Hartford since the early part of the 20th century. WDRC was the state’s first station (1923), and they helped pioneer FM radio technology in the early 1940s. Many Hartford residents learned about the end of World War II via radio, and the medium played a key role in keeping people informed during the floods of 1938 and 1955, the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the great Northeast Blackout of 1965. Surprisingly, Hartford, the capital of “the land of steady habits,” saw two stations break from the pack to help bring the British Invasion to the state in the early 1960s. And thousands of schoolchildren eagerly listened to WTIC’s legendary Bob Steele on wintery mornings as they excitedly awaited school closing announcements. Hartford Radio offers a glimpse into the history of the area’s broadcast stations and the people who ran them.




WTIC (AM) HARTFORD



1960 - Announcers Bob Ellsworth, Dick Bertel, Ed Anderson and Bruce Kern in studio F of the Travelers Grove Street building.  Photo courtesy of wticalumni.com.



Bob Ellsworth and Bob Steele.



Arnold Dean

(This section is under construction. The text below is a draft history, more information is needed.  Please contact us with corrections, updates and/or suggestions. Email us at: admin@hartfordradiohistory.com.)


Above:  This is a rare shot of WTIC's first towers on Avon Mountain.  The towers supported the horizontal section of a "T" antenna, with the vertical portion dropping down to the little house in the middle of the picture.  The bases of these two towers are still intact.  The building was moved to a different location on the property and since 1973 has been the home of WWUH's transmitter.
    You will find a substantial amount of information about the history of this station on Dave Kaplan's wonderful WTIC tribute site at http://www.wticalumni.com/history.htm



    WTIC (AM) dates back to 1925 when it came on the air with 500 watts of power from the 6th floor of the Travelers 26 Grove St bulding in Hartford where there were seven studios, most or all with control rooms. The station was licensed to the Travelers Insurance Company ("TIC") and had studios in downtown Hartford.
    The 1931 CT State Register shows WTIC, owned by Travelers Broadcasting Service, operating on 1060 Khz with 50,000 watts, the most powerful statoin in the state.  By 1941 they had changed frequency to 1080 khz.

    According to contriubtor Robert Paine, the station broadcast from the observation deck of the well known Travelers Tower, Hartford's first skyscraper, on at least three occasions. These were during the floods of 1936, and the hurricanes of 1938 and 1944. In 1938, Ben Hawthorne and Tom McCray handled the broadcast(s), which WTIC fed to the NBC network. In 1944, Bernard "Bunny" Mullins reported conditions during the hurricane.    
    The power was increased to 50,000 watt operation on August 2, 1929 making it one of the very first few stations in the world to achieve that power level. The transmitter, affectionately referred to as "old number one" was the very first 50,000 watt transmitter ever manufactured by
RCA and reportedly had serial number 001 (although at lease one contributor claims he has evidence that it was number 002). This RCA 50 transmitter was the first high power commercial transmitter to use 100-kilowatt tubes, the first to use mercury-vapor type rectifiers throughout, and the first capable of true 100 percent modulation of its full rated 50-kilowatt carrier output.
    Studio locations include the Travelers Insurance building on Grove Street, Broadcast House at 3 Constitution Plaza and 1 Financial Plaza, the "Gold" building. In the late '90s WTIC moved to 10 Executive Drive in Farmington where they joined WRCH-FM and WZMX.

(See associated WTIC 1929 and WTIC Technical pages, left)  


Above:  Aerial view of the WTIC facility on Avon Mountain.  Prior to moving to this site in the 1930's WTIC had it's antenna on top of a building in downtown Hartford.  The two towers on the left are the two Blaw-Knox 1080 towers, errected in the late thirties.  The bases of the two original tower can be seen in about half way between the towers on the left and the channel 3 tower on the right of the cleared area.  The city of Hartford can be seen in the background.


Above:  1929 issue of amateur radio magazine QST featuring WTIC's new Avon Mountain tower site on the tower.  Photo courtesy of wticalumni.com.

Statue of "The Broadcaster" which has been in the WTIC lobby for decades.  Photo courtesy of wticalumni.com.

Above:  For many years the WTIC studios were in the Travelers building at 26 Grove Street along with those of Channel 3.  2009 photo.


Above:  Entrance to Broadcast Plaza on Constitution Plaza, home of WTIC, WTIC-FM and WTIC-TV (then channel 3) in the sixties and seventies.  Photo c. '70s courtesy of wticalumni.com.

WTIC radio occupied the 19th floor of Hartford's "Gold Building" for close to two decades.  2009 photo.


Above:   Program Guide, 1974. Photo courtesy of wticalumni.com.

The letterhead on the stationary used for editorials throughout the seventies.

Article about WTIC announcer Jean Colbert celebrating 25 years on the air.


Above:  AM studio in 2002.

A problem about the history of The Hartford Courant, 1947


The assistant GM of WTIC is "drafted" to serve in the Censorship Dept. in 1943.


WTIC played a key roll in keeping the public informed about the disasterous Circus Fire in 1944


Children's show, 1941

Know someone who grew up listening to Hartford radio?  Why not give them the book "Hartford Radio" as a gift?  Over 220 images of Hartford's radio statoins and DJs going back to 1923!    


1972 Letterhead


Newscaster Phil Becker broadcasts from a temporary New Studio set up as part of a demonstratoin at G. Fox & Co.

WTIC ad, 1976


Tom Ray "(This) morning show (75 or 76) was done on the upper porch at the Connecticut Building at the Big E on Connecticut Day so Tom McCarthy and Arnold Dean would be on hand when the doors opened.  We got there bright and early at 4AM for a 5AM air time – it was a beautiful day to watch the sun come up over West Springfield.  Left to right, Arnold Dean (sports and co-host), Joe Furey (weather), Tom McCarthy, and Tom Ray, CE."


Bob Steele LP!


Brad Davis, currently with WDRC, got his start in Hartford Radio at WTIC in the sixties.

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Brand new Westinghouse 50HG transmitter installed at WTIC in 1947.  The cost was $115,000.00, a huge amount of money in those days.  This transmitter was used as the main transmitter until around 1980 when it was replaced by a Continental rig.  The Westinghouse remainse in standby service for several more years.


Engineering staff, early '80s.


-


Bob Steele


Gary Craig and Co.









Ross Miller (L), Jean Colbert (R)



WTIC morning man Hathaway (L)




















WTIC Timeline – The Decades at a Glance.
      

The 1920’s.

July 29, 1924
    Application for a new Class B station by The Travelers Insurance Co., 26 Grove St., Hartford, CT, requesting 860kc., 500 watts, unlimited hours using the call sign WTIC, is submitted.

December 17, 1924
    The Travelers is authorized by the Bureau of Navigation, Department of Commerce, to operate on 860kc. Notification is made by telegram.

December 22, 1924
    The first test broadcast comes from studio on sixth floor of The Travelers Grove Street building. Vice-President Walter G. Cowles announces. J. Clayton Randall and Herman Taylor are Chief Engineer and Assistant Engineer, respectively.
    Talent is recruited from among employees of The Travelers. The 50-voice Travelers Choral Club and a musical commentator, Prof. W. B. Bailey, are featured.

January 27, 1925
    First license on 860kc., with 500 watts. Licensee was The Travelers Insurance Co. The original location was: 26 Grove St., Hartford CT.


February 10, 1925
    WTIC’s debut, 7:45 to 10:24 p.m. Broadcast at 860 kilocycles (KC) with 500 watts.

Early 1925
    Dana S. Merriman, former supervisor of music for West Hartford public schools, named WTIC musical director. Ralph L. Baldwin, supervisor of music for Hartford public schools, named musical consultant.

    Col. Billy Mitchell addresses WTIC audience by direct wire from Washington, DC. The talk is officially in observance of an air show in Hartford. Mitchell, detained by the military for court martial on charge of criticizing his superiors, delivers a scathing indictment of the Army’s lack of foresight of the importance of military aviation in future wars.

March 27, 1925
    Authorized 630kc. This was an exchange of freq. assignment with WEEI for test purposes.

April 22, 1925
    Granted license renewal on 860kc., with 500 watts.

August 19, 1925
    Authorized 630kc., in an exchange of frequencies with WEEI for tests.

October 17, 1925
    Norman Cloutier’s orchestra is heard for the first time, emanating from the Joseph P. Neville Dancing Academy.

January 21, 1926
    Granted continuous operation on 630kc. pending action on application.
     
February 1, 1926
    WTIC employs first large musical group, The Travelers Symphonic Ensemble directed by Christiaan Kriens.

March 1926
    Remote broadcast from Capitol Theater, Hartford. First live presentation of professional vaudeville.

Mid-1926
    First public broadcast from a moving airplane, Governor Trumbull and Igor Sikorsky.

November 15, 1926
    WTIC becomes the 4th station to join NBC network.

June 1, 1927
    Granted 650kc, 500 watts, unlimited hours.

June 9, 1927
    By special order, returned to 630kc, 500 watts.

June 15, 1927
    Granted 630kc, 500 watts, unlimited hours.

Mid-1927
    WTIC introduces first radio quiz show, “Jack Says: Ask Me Another.”

August 19, 1927
    Granted 560kc, 500 watts, shared with WCAC. There were extensions.

August 29, 1927
    Broadcasting begins on new frequency, 560 KC, with 500 watts.

May 27, 1928
    Station begins “Speaking of Sports” series with A.B. McGinley, Hartford Times Sports Editor.
June 5, 1928
    Applied for a change of transmitter location, site to be determined, new equipment, power increase to 50kw, change hours of operation from shared with WCAC to unlimited.

June 21, 1928
    First broadcast of Yale/Harvard Regatta, remote from New London. Fed to NBC.

September 12, 1928
    Granted C.P. to move transmitter to Avon Mountain, CT, and increase power to 50kw. The location was later redescribed at 375 Deercliff Road, Avon CT.

September 15, 1928
    Granted C.P. for 1060kc, 50kw, shared with WBAL.

November 7, 1928
    Applied for 600kc, 250 watts, unlimited time. This was a reallocation and also involved a change of licensee name to The Travelers Broadcasting Service Corp. Granted 11/14/28.

November 11, 1928
    Broadcasting begins at 600 KC with 250 watts.

December 15, 1928
    Application for mod of C.P. for 1060kc, 50kw, shared with WBAL, for change of transmitter location and type of new equipment. This permit was canceled and reissued 1/31/29 under the new corporate name, The Travelers Broadcasting Service Corp. Granted 11/14/28.

1929
    News bulletins furnished by Hartford Times and Hartford Courant are read at noon and 11:00 p.m.

January 9, 1929
    Granted 600kc, 250 watts, shared WCAC.

January 31, 1929
    Granted C.P. for 1060kc, 50kw, shared with WBAL. Power to be in accordance with General Order 42. Location to be Avon, CT.

March 1, 1929
    Listed as being on 600kc, 250 watts, shared with WCAC.

June 17, 1929
    Application for license for 1060kc, 25kw, 50kw experimentally, shared ½ the time with WBAL.

July 2, 1929
    License granted for 1060kc, 25kw, 50kw experimentally, shared ½ the time with WBAL.

August 2, 1929
    New RCA 50,000 watt transmitter on-line. WTIC broadcasts at 1060 KC. Time is shared with WBAL, Baltimore.

August 5, 1929
    Leonard J. Patricelli is hired as New England’s first full-time continuity writer. For some time, he wrote virtually every word heard over the air on WTIC.

October 1929
    Norman Cloutier’s “Merry Madcaps” begin broadcasting on WTIC.

Fall 1929
    WTIC begins programming recorded music.

December 1929
    Paul W. Morency becomes General Manager, assuming control from James Clancy.

The 1930’s.

1930
    A model electric kitchen was installed at the WTIC studios in order to permit Florrie Bishop Bowering, hostess of “The Mixing Bowl,” WTIC’s cooking school of the air, to test her recipes before broadcasting them. The kitchen was one floor above the sixth floor studios, and Miss Bowering tried her creations on staff members prior to her program.

January 1, 1930
    WTIC issues its first commercial rate card.

Winter 1930
    First year of part-time operation at 1060 KC completed. Time shared with WBAL.

December 16, 1930
    Authorized 660kc, for synchronization tests with WEAF when WBAL is operating on 1060kc. There were extensions.

1931
    Ed Begley joined WTIC as a member of the “WTIC Playhouse.”

March 16, 1931
    Synchronized broadcasting with WEAF (660 KC) goes into effect.

September 23, 1931
    First production of “WTIC Playhouse.”

July 1932
    WTIC organizes New England Network: WEEI, Boston MA; WCSH, Portland ME; WTAG, Worcester, MA; WJAR, Providence, RI; WTIC, Hartford, CT.

July 15, 1932
    Automatic frequency control installed.

December 1932
    “Musical Clock” begins, sponsored by Sage-Allen. Runs 7:00 to 8:00 a.m., every other day for over a year.

1933
    Irwin Cowper joined WTIC as announcer. He became script writer and continuity editor, later was promoted to assistant sales manager of WTIC and sales manager of WTIC-TV.

    “The Men of Song”, organized by Leonard Patricelli, debuts on WTIC.

    “The Wrightville Daily Clarion,” featuring Paul Lucas, Eunice Greenwood and Fred Wade, debuts on WTIC. It runs until 1939 and is reincarnated as “Wrightville Folks” for a brief run in 1949.

November 3, 1933
    Applied for Special Experimental Authorization to change frequency from 1060kc to 1040kc, using 50kw, operating simultaneously with KRLD. Granted 3/30/34. There were extensions.

May 8, 1934
    WTIC begins sharing frequency with KRLD, Dallas, at 1040 KC.

Fall 1934
    Ben Hawthorne purchases “Morning Watch” time slot, 7:00 to 8:00.

1935
    Bernard “Bunny” Mullins joins the WTIC announcing staff.

    Joseph Blum, Sid Pearl, Salvatore D’Steffano and Sid Gowan lead musical groups heard on WTIC.

    WTIC is operating 17-1/2 hours on weekdays and 14 hours on Sunday.

June 16, 1935
    WTIC begins morning, noon, early evening and late evening news broadcasts. News supplied by Transradio News Service.

September 1935
    G. Fox & Company assumes sponsorship of “Morning Watch.”

October 1935
    Andre Schenker, assistant professor of history at the University of Connecticut, begins “History in the Headlines.” He is later named WTIC’s foreign affairs analyst.


1936
    “Hull’s Hour of Cheer,” a program of music sponsored by Hull brewing company, is produced by Leonard Patricelli. Bob Steele is one of the announcers.

March 1936
    WTIC provides extensive public service during the spring floods.

September 1936
    WTIC withdraws from New England Network. Joins Yankee Network. Transradio News Service discontinued, news now taken from Yankee Network, and for the next two years, no local newscasts originate at WTIC.

September 29, 1936
    Granted authorization to rebroadcast programs from station W1XEV to determine the usefulness of very high frequencies to form a relay link, for the period 9/29/36 to 2/1/37.

October 1, 1936
    A chap by the name of Robert L. (for Elmer) Steele, was hired as a junior announcer. Not one to settle down for long, he only stayed with the station full-time until 1991. Unwilling to let go completely, he kept his hand in part-time until his much-mourned passing in December 2002. You might say he practically died in the saddle (at about 202 ¾ pounds). Just like Bob, I guess. (What say one of his features is named “The Bob Steele Memorial Antenna Switch?”) The Word for the Day is “miss,” as in “we miss you.”

September 1, 1938
    Yankee Network News is discontinued. The Transradio News Service is reinstated, and Transradio’s Central Connecticut bureau is given space at WTIC.

September 21, 1938
    WTIC again serves the community by devoting its facilities to coverage of the hurricane recovery effort.

January 30, 1939
    Applied for C.P. to install directional antenna for night use. License granted 12/1/39.

June 1939
    Travelers Broadcasting Service Corporation applies to the FCC for a television broadcasting license.

The 1940’s.

1940
    Robert S. “Bob” Tyrol was hired as an announcer. At 17, he is the youngest member of the announcing staff.

February 5, 1940
    Travelers Broadcasting begins operating an experimental FM station, W1XSO.

March 29, 1940
    Authorized to operate on 1040kc, 50kw, DA-N, unlimited time, simultaneously with KRLD.

September 10, 1940
    Authorized 1040kc, 50kw DA-N, to be used following sunset at Dallas, TX.

1941
    N. Thomas Eaton is hired as News Director.

January 1941
    WTIC and The Hartford Courant created “The Mile O’ Dimes,” to raise money for the fight against polio. In 15 years, over $1,200,000 is collected.

January 15-30, 1941
    The first “Mile O’ Dimes” drive is held. A special red-and-white broadcast booth was erected on the north side of Asylum Street, across Main Street from the Old State House. James Clancy was appointed director, with engineer Jack Murphy as custodian of the booth.

March 24, 1941
    Under NARBA, they were granted 1080kc, 50kw, DA-N, using the directional antenna following sunset at Dallas, TX.

March 29, 1941
    WTIC begins operations at 1080 KC.

July 26, 1941
    Ed Anderson describes one of the final runs of Hartford’s yellow trolley cars, scheduled to stop running Sunday, July 27. Remote broadcast is made over shortwave transmitter WEKW.

December 4, 1941
    A span of the under-construction Bulkeley Bridge collapsed, killing and injuring workmen. Bob Steele reports from the scene, on the west bank of the Connecticut River, a short distance from the Dutch Point power station.

December 7, 1941
    “The Sabbath Message” is in progress from Studio G. Fred Wade is given a message and signals the minister, who cuts short his sermon. Wade reads the first bulletin about the attack on Pearl Harbor. WTIC switches to the NBC network before organist Hal Kolb has to play “Joy to the World.”

December 15, 1941
    FM station begins operation on a permanent basis. Call letters are changed to W-53-H. “The Morning Watch” is added to the schedule.

December 23, 1941
    Voluntary transfer of control of licensee corp., to the Travelers Insurance Co. from the Travelers Bcst. Service Corp.

World War 2

    Some of the war-related programs heard produced locally by WTIC are:

Connecticut Yankees at Camp Wheeler
The Armed Forces Club Sing
Uncle Jim’s Victory Garden
Here Comes the Band
Rationing
You’re in the Army Now!
Submarine Patrol
Connecticut on the Alert
Wings for Tomorrow
Connecticut Men and Women in the War
Quartermaster Quarter-hour
The Victory Hour

    Produced by WTIC and broadcast over the NBC Network, was “The United States Coast Guard on Parade.” Originating at the Coast Guard Academy in New London and emceed by Bob Tyrol, the program was aimed at promoting Coast Guard recruitment.
    Announcer Tyrol became so enamored with what he was saying about the Coast Guard, he joined, became a Lieutenant (j.g.) and commanded a vessel in the Pacific. Not only the youngest announcer on WTIC and NBC, he was the youngest Coast Guard officer in the war.
    Semper Paratus, Bob.

1942
    “Gems of American Jazz,” debuts, hosted by George Malcolm-Smith. It runs until 1951.

    “Yale Interprets the News” is heard over WTIC. Bernard Mullins is the interrogator.

January 18, 1942
    WTIC is operating under the U.S. Office of Censorship’s Code of Practices. A short time later, WTIC is authorized to sell War Bonds.

1943
    WTIC brings the NBC program “Information Please” to the Bushnell Auditorium for the start of the Second War Loan Drive in Connecticut. 3,300 bond purchasers raised more than $203 million in War Bonds.

July 4, 1943
    WTIC’s V-for-Victory hourly time tone goes on the air.

November 1, 1943
    W-53-H FM call letters are changed to WTIC FM.

January 1944
    The annual “Mile O’ Dimes” campaign collected $51,358, or more that 5-7/8 miles.

July 6, 1944
    WTIC facilities are put at the disposal of fire and Red Cross authorities following the Ringling Brothers, Barnum & Bailey Circus fire.

December 20, 1944
    WTIC initiates a series on alcoholism, the first radio series of its kind.

November 1945
    Moshe Paranov begins the series “Encores,” featuring the WTIC String Ensemble.

January 14, 1946
    The fire prevention campaign gets under way as Governor Baldwin calls a state conference on fire hazards.

March 1946
    “Songs of Acadia,” featuring pianist Laura Gaudet, debuts on WTIC. (Announcer: Bob Tyrol?)

March 1946
    “The Downhomers” begins a series of early morning broadcasts which are fed to the New England Regional Network.
June 21, 1946
    Applied for C.P. to install new transmitter (Westinghouse 50-HG-1). Granted 8/2/46. License granted 9/3/47.

July 1946
    Frank Atwood is appointed Farm Program Director at WTIC. Farm Safety Week is observed July 21-27.

1947
    Noontime music program with Rudy Martin begins.

June 1947
    Jean Colbert is named hostess of “Radio Bazaar” and Director of Women’s Activities at WTIC.

August 1947
    “Cinderella Weekend” premieres on WTIC.


August 22, 1947
Bob Steele covers the blow-by-blow action of the Willie Pep-Jock Leslie featherweight championship bout.

September 1947
    WTIC sets up quarters at the Eastern States Exposition. Bob Steele, Frank Atwood, “The Downhomers” and “Quiz of Two Cities” are broadcast from the fair.

November 8, 1947
    “Mind Your Manners” debuts with Allen Ludden.

November 1947
    Glenn Rowell (of the Gene and Glenn comedy team) and Leonard Patricelli organize a Hartford Friendship Train to raise funds and gather food for Europe’s hungry.

April 11, 1948
    WTIC FM begins operations at its current frequency, 96.5 megacycles.

February 1949
    Tape recorders are added to WTIC’s facilities.

February 1949
    WTIC receives a Variety magazine award for youth programming, including “Mind Your Manners,” the Farm Youth Program and “Carnival Junior Legion.”

The 1950’s.    

May 1950
    WTIC’s “Mind Your Manners” receives the George Foster Peabody Award and the Ohio State Broadcasting Award for the most outstanding youth program in the nation.

November 7, 1950
    WTIC’s statewide reporting receives overwhelming public commendation.

June 1952
    WTIC broadcasts “You and Your Child,” John J. Scherescheswsky’s educational and entertaining feature on parenting.

December 6, 1952
    “Ross, The Musical Miller” takes over the afternoon drive time, 5:10 to 6:00 p.m.

April 12, 1952
    “The Bob Steele Show” grows in popularity and is lengthened to run from 6:45 to 8:00 a.m.

June 12, 1954
    WTIC carries the premier broadcast of “Monitor” from the NBC Radio Network.

August 10, 1955
    WTIC goes on the air with special broadcast, “Connecticut on the Alert.” Governor Abraham Ribicoff and others warn citizens of the approaching hurricane, “Connie.”

November 15, 1955
    The Travelers Weather Service develops probability forecasting. WTIC is the first station to broadcast weather reports using the new method.

November 16, 1955
    WTIC inaugurates a new series called “Yale Reports.” A replacement for “Yale Interprets the News,” the series provides analysis and interpretation of important issues as well as music, theater and folklore.

December 31, 1956
    WTIC interrupts regular programming to cover the St. Joseph’s Cathedral fire.

April 20, 1957
    WTIC begins regular coverage of Boston Red Sox baseball.

December 8, 1957
    WTIC AM and WTIC FM present their first stereophonic broadcast. Listeners need two receivers, spaced about six feet apart, to hear stereo.

December 1959
    Hartford Times editor Sereno Gammell hosts WTIC’s first nighttime issue-oriented telephone talk show, “What’s Your Opinion?”

The 1960’s.

April 4, 1960
    Weather reports are relayed to Earth from a satellite 400 miles in space. Satellite reports become part of WTIC and Travelers Weather forecasts.

August 22, 1960
Network radio serials come to an end (on NBC).

September 29, 1961
    Studio location changed to Broadcast House, Three Constitution Plaza, Hartford, 15, CT.

November 22, 1963
    “Mikeline,” WTIC’s ‘neighbors-over-the-backyard-fence’ call-in program, is interrupted by word of the wounding of President Kennedy. Bob Ellsworth and Floyd Richards are hosting the program as one of the most significant events of the 20th Century unfolds.

July 24, 1964
    Voluntary assignment of license to Broadcast Plaza, Inc.  

July 14, 1965
    WTIC is the first station to broadcast on a laser beam. Beam links the Springfield Museum of Science of Science and WTIC studios in Hartford.

April 1968
    WTIC’s Leonard Patricelli works with Edmund Downes of The Hartford Courant to develop the Martin Luther King Fund.

July 28, 1969
    WTIC carries the voices of the first men to walk on the Moon.

Late 1969
    WTIC aids in the promotion of The Stamford Drug Curriculum. The 96-page educational guide, designed to familiarize schoolchildren with the hazards of drug use, was eventually distributed nationwide and in several foreign countries.

August 12, 1971
    Transmitter changed to Continental Electronics 317C.

January 30, 1974
    Voluntary assignment of license to Ten-Eighty Corporation.

September 3, 1974
    Studio location changed to One Financial Plaza (Gold Building).

January 25, 1977
    Application for voluntary transfer of control of licensee corporation to David T. Chase. Granted 2/23/77.

November 11, 1979
    Westinghouse 50-HG-1 now listed as the auxiliary transmitter.





WTIC – newspaper items.
         5/9/2005 9:27 PM

The Hartford Daily Courant, Tuesday, February 10, 1925    
(photo caption: The smaller studio at station WTIC. This studio for alternate use is fully equipped with soundproof walls and curtains for managing the acoustics, and up-to-date loud speaker of its own which operates when anything is going on in the large studio elsewhere.

(Hartford Times, February 10, 1925, pg. 17)
TRAVELERS RADIO IN DEBUT TO-NIGHT
 Station WTIC, Broadcasting at
 348.6 Meters Wave Length,
 to Have Formal Opening
ELABORATE PROGRAM TO BE SENT ON AIR
  Vice-President Walter G. Cowles Will Make Introductory Address at 7:45

    This is the official opening night of Broadcasting Station WTIC, Travelers Insurance company, Hartford, broadcasting at a wave length of 348.6 meters. After months of preparation the new station is ready to send it programming (unintelligible) and at 7:45 p.m. Vice-President Walter G. Cowles, in charge of broadcasting at the new station, will face the microphone in on of the beautifully equipped studios and will officially introduce Station WTIC to the world of radio. His fifteen minute announcement will be followed by music by the Heimberger trio from the Hotel Bond and by vocal selections by a quartet from the Mendelssohn Glee club in New York, brought to the city for the occasion by Ralph L. Baldwin, of Hartford, conductor of the Mendelssohn club and consulting musical director of the Travelers station. They will be followed by vocal selections by Mrs. Gertrude McAuliffe of Hartford, contralto, accompanied by Mrs. Burton Yaw, pianist. The musical program will continue until 10:30 when Station WTIC will sign off for the evening, to be heard again on Thursday evening when the station will broadcast the program of the Victor artists.
    The Travelers program will be announced by Vice-President Cowles and Elliott E. Buse, manager of the Travelers station, who will alternate at the microphone. Dana S. Merriman, the musical director of the studio, will have supervision of the program, and the mechanical portion of the work will be in charge of J. Clayton Randall, engineer of plant, Herman D. Taylor, chief operator, and William F. Coleman, assistant operator. This staff has made all preparations for the opening and no last minute details have been left to occasion a possible delay.
            Orchestra Well-Known
    The orchestra, which will open the program, is well known to Hartford. It is led by Emil Heimberger, violin, with Philip Moss as pianist and Lee Joseffer, cello. A special program has been arranged for the trio’s share in the evening’s entertainment.
    The Mendelssohn quartet is made up of four of the best vocalists of the famous Mendelssohn Glee club of New York, which, for some years, has been conducted by Ralph L. Baldwin, who conducts the Hartford Choral club. The members of the quartet are Carl F. Mathleu, first tenor; Joseph Mathleu, second tenor; Harold N. Wiley, baritone, and Stanley Boughman, bass.
                 Station Soundproof.
    The new station’s studio rooms, each as nearly soundproof as possible, have been completed and WTIC is fully prepared to go ahead with its regular schedule of programs. It will broadcast twice a week, on Tuesdays and Fridays with special programs on other occasions, such as the Victor program on Thursday evening and the broadcast of the inauguration of President Coolidge when that event occurs. There have been a number of delays in the completing of the work, which has been under the direction of Vice-President Cowles, and Hartford has waited with interest the opening of the regular schedule.
    The station has been “on the air” previously, with experimental programs and with a broadcast of the program of Christmas carols by the Travelers Choral club. The delay in opening has occasioned many rumors and reports that there was all sorts of trouble have filtered about the city. Most of the delay of the past week or so has been due to the fitting and decorating of the studio rooms. During that time there have been tests of the apparatus on occasions, leading to reports that the station was opened, and dozens of calls have been received by the radio department of THE TIMES inquiring as to the programs.
    The station is fully equipped for giving the most complete studio programs, but is also equipped with leadings for broadcasting of programs from distant points in the city and elsewhere. Its programs will include not only the choicest talent in this section, but rebroadcasts of some of the best programs to be put out by other stations, such as WEAF, New York, from where the Victor program will be started to a dozen different stations Thursday evening. TRAVELERS RADIO STARTS TONIGHT

New Station’s First Program
     to Be Broadcaster
           At 7:45.

    The Travelers Insurance company radio station will be formally opened tonight when at 7:45 Vice-President Walter G. Cowles, through whose efforts the station was started, will make an introductory announcement through the air from the station, WTIC.
    The studio program will open at 8 o’clock, broadcasting Emil Heimbergers trio, violin, cello and piano selections at the Hotel Bond. Several selections will be sung by a male quartet from the Mendelssohn Glee Club of New York, composed of Carl F. Mathleu, first tenor; Joseph Mathley, second tenor; Harold N. Wiley, baritone; and Stanley Boughman, bass. Miss Gertrude McAuliffe, contralto, will sing and the station will sign off at 10:30 p.m.
    The government experts have pronounced the station one of the finest in the country and it will no doubt to be heard from coast to coast tonight. In addition to the regular army of radio enthusiasts, Travelers representatives all over the United States and Canada will be turning the dial to 348.6 meters when the big transmitter opens up.
                Two Nights A Week
    WTIC will broadcast every Tuesday and Friday evening a regular program. Thursday of this week an added attraction has been arranged, however, and the local station will relay the Victor Talking Machine Company program from WEAF, New York, at 8 p.m. The Travelers station has been listed as class B and will use 500 watts.
    The new broadcasting station has a four room studio, each room being as nearly sound proof as science can devise. The walls have been treated with a sound proof mixture and the floors are covered with thick carpets. One of the rooms is a reception room, where the artists assemble and wait their turn. There are two studio rooms from which programs can be broadcast. One smaller than the main studio, gives opportunity for numbers to be given in quick succession.




The Hartford Daily Times, Friday, February 13, 1925 pg.31

Last Night On The Air
                BY R. W. C.

    Thanks to WTIC, the Travelers station, the fourth Victor concert, broadcast jointly by WEAF, WTIC and ten other prominent station last evening was the best to date so far as clearness of reception was concerned and it was perhaps well that the local station was linked with the other for it was a noisy night for me on other than nearby broadcasters. The concert brought before the microphone Emilio De Gogorza, world famous baritone, Mme. Renee Chemet, the French violinist, and the Victor Salon orchestra, and the hour’s program was one that would appeal to all classes of music lovers for the selections ranged from the better grade of popular numbers to famous arias from popular operas. De Gogorza was in fine voice and his numbers were exactly as we have heard him on many of his Victor records. Mme. Chemet’s playing was charming and this Victor artist has added thousands of new friends and admirers through her appearance “on the air.” The Victor Salon orchestra opened the concert with a carefully selected list of numbers. Aside from the fact that the reception from WTIC was better than any we have had on previous concerts, the concert itself proved one of the most enjoyable of the series. Applause is due to the artists, the Victor company and the Travelers. We anxiously await the next Victor hour which comes two weeks from last evening.
                *                 *                 *
    Previous to the opening of the concert, Vice-President Walter G. Cowles of the Travelers, told his hearers of the method used in broadcasting such an event in conjunction with another station and corrected the erroneous understanding that many have that it is retransmitted. It is of course a direct transmission over wires exactly the same as the broadcast of the central station at which the concert is held. There was not a hitch or a break during the two hours the Travelers was broadcasting and the excellent modulation of the station resulted in almost perfect reception.
                *        *        *


The Hartford Daily Courant, Thursday, December 4, 1930, pg.1

WTIC Enters
 Plan For Full
   Time On Air

Synchronization With
   WEAF Every Other
   Day Basis of Scheme
   Now Before Commission

New Development
     In Broadcasting

Petition Asks Baltimore
   Coordinate With WJZ –
   Work Begins At Once if
    Permit Is Granted

    Station WTIC, of Hartford, will soon be on the air full time if the Federal Radio Commission grants applications filed this week by the Travelers Insurance Company, The National Broadcasting Company and the Consolidated Gas, Electric Light and Power Company of Baltimore, the latter owners of Station WBAL, which now shares a wave length with WTIC. Every other day WTIC would then be synchronized with WEAF of the National Broadcasting Company and the remainder of the time would be on its own wave length of 1060 Kilocycles.
     This first permanent synchronizing plan under normal broadcasting conditions – long a dream of radio engineers – will not only effect an important step in the development of network transmission, but will also enable WTIC and WBAL, which have hitherto shared a wave length, to give full time service in their respective areas.

                Alternate  on  Channels.

    This is the plan, as outlined in the joint petitions now before the commission: Instead of remaining silent on alternate days, WTIC and WBAL will synchronize with one of NBC’s key stations in New York. WTIC will coordinate its transmitter with WEAF and WBAL will broadcast on the same wave length as WJZ. In the meantime, the two stations will retain the wave length of 1060 kilocycles now jointly allotted to them. WBAL will use this channel one day, while WTIC synchronizes with, and accepts programs from WEAF; and on the following day the positions will be reversed, with WBAL and WJZ in the synchronizing roles.
    M. H. Aylesworth, president of NBC, announced several weeks ago that synchronization was definitely past the laboratory stage. But the fact that a practical application was imminent became know only this week, when petitions were filed by NBC; by the Travelers Insurance Company, representing WTIC; and by the Consolidated Gas, Electric Light and Power Company of Baltimore, representing WBAL.
    The synchronization of the two sets of stations, if successful, will culminate years of experiments by radio engineers. C. W. Horn, general engineer of NBC, has wrestled with the problem ever since the idea was first conceived, and for the past 12 months has been supervising NBC’s intensive work leading to the present solution.

                Difficult  Conditions

    “In undertaking to synchronize WTIC and WEAF, and WBAL and WJZ,” Horn declares, “we face what is perhaps the most difficult possible set of conditions. All of the stations involved have high power. Furthermore, they are not far apart geographically, their service areas adjoin, and dangers from interference are consequently great. This means that the synchronization must be perfect.”
    “We feel, therefore, that if the synchronizing set-ups work in these instances, we shall have given a final demonstration that our equipment is adequate, and that the theoretical and practical problems are solved.”
    If the construction permits are granted by the Federal Radio Commission, work will begin immediately on the necessary equipment. On those days when WTIC yields to WBAL, WTIC will then be synchronized with WEAF on the latter’s wave length of 660 kilocycles; and on the following day, WBAL will share WJZ’s band of 760 kilocycles. The arrangement will not only afford the two associate station a full-time broadcasting schedule, but will also make available many new NBC features in the Hartford and Baltimore areas.


The Hartford Daily Times, Thursday, December 11, 1930, pg.24

HOME ECONOMIST
  SPEAKS OVER WTIC
Louisiana Expert Talks During
      Farm and House Hour.

    Miss Mary Mims, home economist of the University of Louisiana, addressed Connecticut’s farm folk over station WTIC this noon on the Farm and Home forum hour. In her talk, she mentioned a few of the outstanding features of the American Farm Bureau federation convention which closed yesterday at Boston, pointing out that the sessions provided a medium for co-operative discussion and study of the nation’s farm problem.
    Pleading for more co-operative effort along the lines of marketing of farm products, Miss Mims stated that production must be adjusted to meet demands. Co-operation in the United States must know no sectionalism, emphasized the speaker.
    Miss Mims was one of the speakers at the national farm bureau federation convention and was engaged to address the Connecticut radio audience by S. McLean Buckingham, state commissioner of agriculture. To-night, she is scheduled to address the Middlesex county farm bureau meeting at Middletown.

Wednesday, December 30, 1936, pg.1

GRACE MOORE
 SINGS JAN. 10
    AT BUSHNELL
Rapee Will Conduct, with
    Milton Cross Master
         of Ceremonies
(article edited)

    Grace Moore will come across the continent to sing in Hartford Sunday night, Jan. 10, at Bushnell Memorial.
    The event will be one in the series of “Good Neighbor” concerts arranged by General Motors, which will be presented at Bushnell that evening in response to an invitation from Governor Cross.
    Miss Moore will sing; the 70-piece General Motors Orchestra will play under the direction of the permanent conductor, Erno Rapee, and Milton J. Cross, widely known announcer, will serve as master of ceremonies.

            Three  Previous Concerts

    On Oct. 4, the first such concert was staged in Philadelphia. The two other concerts in the limited series were held in Minneapolis and Cleveland.

    Part of the concert here on Jan. 10 will be broadcast. Upwards of 10,000,000 listeners have been estimated to be tuned in at that time - a nation-wide audience that will hear Cross tell of the wonders and beauty of Bushnell Memorial Hall.
    More than 60 stations of the NBC-WEAF network will broadcast part of the concert throughout the United States and Canada, between 10 and 11 p.m. WTIC will be the local transmitter.


    
            





Hartford Times, Monday, January 11, 1937

Trinity Glee Club Announces Schedule
    The concert schedule of the Trinity Glee Club has been announced by John D. Banks, business manager, as follows:
    Jan. 19, Hartford Retreat; Feb. 16, broadcast over Station WDRC; Feb. 26, Glee Club Festival at Bushnell Memorial; Apr. 9, St. Margaret’s School, Waterbury; Apr. 16, Briarcliff Manor.
    A broadcast over WTIC in the spring is anticipated.
    Clarence E. Watters, college organist, is rehearsing the group.
                ______________________________


The Hartford Daily Times, February 18, 1937, pg.1

STORRS PROGRAMS
NOW REBROADCAST
WTIC Replaces Tele-
phone with Transmis-
      sion by Radio

    A new method of receiving programs from the radio station at Connecticut State College for re-transmission now is being used with success by Station WTIC in Hartford.
    Instead of using telephone wires to bring the college programs here, where they are broadcast, WTIC now is employing what J. Clayton Randall, plant manager, describes as a “uni-directional receptor array.”
    A complicated appearing antenna system suspended from the two old towers of WTIC, the receptor had been mistaken for the transmitting antenna of the police radio station.
    It is used to receive on the three-meter band short wave, ultra-high frequency transmissions from the college at Storrs. The transmissions then are re-broadcast on the regular frequency of WTIC.
    According to Mr. Randall, reception from the Storrs station, W1XEV, is comparable to that afforded by telephone wires. There is no static.
    The Storrs station recently discontinued its regular broadcast department.

RADIOLOG 1931?

WTIC’S CHIEF ANNOUNCER

    Paul Lucas, chief announcer of Station WTIC of Hartford, is a member of that considerable army whose members are distinguished by the words, “I was once a newspaper man myself”.  Paul forsook the Fourth Estate to enter radio, which might be termed the Fifth Estate, After the customary apprenticeship of writing up obituaries, lodge notes, police court news and editing copy on a Connecticut newspaper, he was appointed
    In his spare hours he was announcer for and gave monologues in the broadcasts of the WTIC Jesters, who were destined to achieve national fame as the Tastyeast Jesters of the national network. His appearances with the Jesters proved the “open sesame” to a radio career, for in 1927 he was offered a position as announcer on the WTIC staff. That was when the Connecticut was operating on only 500 watts. Paul has remained with the station and is now chief announcer of New England’s only 50,000 watt broadcaster. In his present capacity, six other announcers address him as “the boss”. And a darn good boss he is, too, for a more amiable person would be hard to find.
    Lucas writes his own continuities and each week offers an intimate chat entitled “Behind the Scenes”, in which he discusses current events in the realms of radio and gives inside tips on what goes on in the WTIC studios.

The Hartford Daily Courant, Sunday, December 14, 1930, pg. 10 E

Station Review Shows Growth In Past Year

WTIC Achieves Record in Operation and for Consistent Long-Range Coverage

    With New Year’s just around the corner, when recapitulations of the events of the waning year are in order, Station WTIC of Hartford looks upon 1930 as the period of its greatest progress.
    Firmly established as one of the nation’s leading stations by virtue of the efficiency and power of its new 50,000-watt transmitter, WTIC has endeavored to build up an organization in keeping with the excellence of its technical facilities. With this aim in view, it has possessed itself of the largest staff of musicians and entertainers maintained by any station, except the key station of the two major national networks.
    The highlights of the year at WTIC besides the augmenting of its staff, include the introduction of several ambitious programs, the forming of several hook-ups with WTIC as the key station, and the transmission of a number of important programs in association with the National Broadcasting Company.
                Achieves  Record.
    An unprecedented record has been achieved by WTIC during the year for consistent long-range coverage. Since January, the Connecticut station has obtained proof that it is heard as far east as France and as far west as Australia. Indeed, reports from France, England and Ireland indicate that WTIC is heard more frequently and more distinctly in Europe than any other station operating on long wave. The farthest point northward at which WTIC programs are heard appears to be of the northern coast of Siberia in the Arctic Circle, while the farthest southern points are in Chile and Bolivia in South America.
    Under its present schedule of operation, WTIC is on the air 55 hours a week, A summary of schedules for the year reveal that the quotas allotted various types of programs each week are in general as follows: 14 hours of classical music; 13 hours of popular dance music; 11 hours of programs that combine both popular and classical music, five and half hours of educational material, including agricultural and domestic features; five and a half hours devoted to topics of interest to the feminine audience; an hour and 15 minutes of humorous and dramatic features; two and a half hours of news bulletins and sports chats; 30 minutes of juvenile entertainment; and about three hours of features miscellaneous in content.
    Seventy-seven per cent of the time that the transmitter was in operation this year was devoted to programs emanating directly from the WTIC studios, while 23 per cent was occupied by programs broadcast through the National network.
    During the year, WTIC has fed programs from its own studios to five other New England stations. It has transmitted several programs sponsored by various communities, notably Halifax, Nova Scotia; Hamilton, Ontario; Great Barrington, Mass.; and Norwich, Conn.
    Among the celebrities who have addressed the radio audience through WTIC microphones during 1930 are William Gillette, Florence Reed. Paul Muni, Mary Boland, Winchell Smith, Robert E. Sherwood, Governor John H. Trumbull of Connecticut, Mayor Walter E. Batterson of Hartford, Neal O’Hara, Billy B. Van, “Lester Green,” Motor Vehicle Commissioner R. B. Stoeckel of Connecticut, United States Senator Felix Hebert of Rhode Island, Robert MacGunigle, “Kid” Kaplan, “Bat” Battalino, Secretary of the Interior Ray Lyman Wilbur, National Commander O. L. Bodenhamer of the American Legion, and Harry K. Morton.
                Plays  Important Role.
    WTIC played an important role in the recent state election campaign, when noted political leaders spoke in behalf of the Democratic and Republican candidates for the governorship, and when Governor-elect Wilbur Cross and Lieut. Governor Ernest E. Rogers addressed the audience on the eve of the election.
    Through the facilities of the network, WTIC this year broadcast five speeches by President Hoover, and brought to its auditors the voices of King George of England and Premier Ramsay McDonald from overseas.
    A number of musicians of national renown have taken part during the year in the weekly “Travelers Hour,” the roster containing such entertainers as Howard Preston, baritone of the Chicago Opera Company; several network stars, including Erva Giles, Robert Simmons, Ruth Rodgers, Alma Kitchell, Lanny Ross, Amy Goldsmith, Earle Spicer, Thelma Kessler, Gitia Erstinn, Leslie Frick and Alois Havrilla; John Goss, the English baritone; Nicholas Vasilieff and the Russian Cathedral Quartet; Alexander Kisselburgh, celebrated oratorio soloist; Allan Burt and May Silveira of the American Opera Company, Helen Jepson and Fenanda Doria of the Philadelphia Opera Company.
    The following chronological summary will refresh memories of member of the WTIC audience on some of the high points of the year:
    The first notable feature of 1930 was the rebroadcast through the network of the five-power naval parley in London. The program went on the air at 6 A. M., but those who arose that early were rewarded by hearing speeches by King George and Ramsay MacDonald. Also during January, WTIC broadcast proceedings from the Hartford Auto Show, with music by Vincent Lopez and his orchestra, Peter Van Steeden and the New Yorkers, and Sam Lanin’s Troubadours. The broadcast of the annual Hartford Chamber of Commerce banquet was four hours chockful of entertainment, with J. J. Pelley, president of the New York, new Haven and Hartford Railroad, and Neal O’Hara, newspaper humorist, as principal speakers, and with Seth Parker’s Singing School. Texas Guinan’s Spanish Trio, The Yale Glee Club Quartet, the Royal Marimba Band and Harry Welch offering divertissement. During January, too, the Reo Dance Marathon was staged, with Norm Cloutier and the WTIC dance band playing requests until 2 A. M.
                Celebrated  Fifth  Birthday.
    On the tenth of February, WTIC celebrated its fifth birthday with an all-night program that was heard in 43 states of the union. The all-star bill included a special program transmitted to the WTIC studios by Rudy Vallee and his Connecticut Yankees, and a congratulatory program from the N.B.C. headquarters featuring Clarence Williams’ Colored band and members of the “Hot Chocolates” cast. Officials and entertainers from nine New England and New York stations participated. Other talent imported into the studios included the South Sea Islanders, Breen and De Rose, the Silver Masked Tenor, Chestor Gaylord and the Knickerbocker Quartet. Governor Trumbull gave a brief address, while a concert orchestra under Christiaan Kriens conductorship and the Merry Madcaps under the baton of Norm Cloutier kept the ether waves filled until 6 A. M.
    Another treat in February was the East Hartford Chamber of Commerce, during which speeches were made by Lester D. Gardner, councilor of the Aeronautical Chamber of Commerce, Frederick B. Rentschler and George S. Wheat of the United Aircraft and Transport Company, with musical interludes by Bill Tasillo and his WTIC Sparklers. Also in February was heard the first of an important series of organ recitals from the new Horace Bushnell Memorial, presenting some of the nation’s foremost virtuosos of the console. Vincent H. Percy, of the Cleveland Public Auditorium, opened the series, to be followed in the same month by the late Lynnwood Farnum, organist of the Church of the Holy Communion in New York City.
    During March, WTIC adherents heard eye-witness descriptions of the Mardi Gras in New Orleans through WTIC and the network. Lieut. Felix Ferdinando and his Band gave a series of concerts and the glee clubs of Wesleyan University and Middlebury College contributed programs during the month. Linked with WEEI of Boston, The Travelers transmitter broadcast the start of the maiden trip of the crack express, the Yankee Clipper, from South Terminal in the Hub. Another notable feature in March was the special program dedicated to the maritime provinces of Canada, with Mayor William C, Borett, manager of CHNS of Halifax as guest speaker. From the Bushnell Memorial, organ recitals were broadcast by Edwin Arthur Kraft, organist of Trinity Church in Cleveland; Walter Dawley, well known Hartford organist, and Esther Nelson, organist of the Church of the Redeemer in Hartford.
                Important  Broadcasts.
    President Hoover made his first speech of the year in April, when he and President Livingston Ferrand of Cornell University paid tribute over the network to Dr. William Henry Welch of Johns Hopkins University on Dr. Welch’s eightieth birthday. Also during April, Edward L. Laubin and Moshe Paranov, two outstanding Hartford musicians, took over the alternate conductorship of the concerts entitled “Orchestral Gems.” The Bushnell Memorial organists that month included Palmer Christian, professor of music at the University of Michigan; Gordon Balch Nevin, celebrated Pennsylvania composer and organist; Carl McKinley of the New England conservatory of Music, and Joseph L. Daltry, professor of music at Wesleyan University.
    In a special May Day program, Robert T. Hurley, commissioner of state police of Connecticut; Dr. S. M. Osborn, Connecticut’s commissioner of health, and Rabbi Abraham Feldman, were speakers, and 200 children of the Brown School chorus sang under the direction of Ralph L. Baldwin. Two important sports events, the Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs in Kentucky and the Sharkey-Schmelling heavyweight championship bout were transmitted through the network. An unusual feature of the month of May was a broadcast effected from a traveling airplane. While cruising above the city in the “Arabelle” plane, American Legion Commander O. L. Bodenhamer and Governor Trumbull spoke into microphones connected with short wave receivers below, so that their words were received by the radio audience. The Bushnell Memorial organ series was concluded during the month, with Alexander McCurdy, organist of the Second Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia in one program, and with Pietro Yon honorary organist of the Vatican in Rome and organists of St. Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth Avenue, in the final presentation.
    President Hoover spoke twice  through WTIC and the network during June, once in presenting the National Geographic Medal to Admiral Richard E, Byrd and again at the unveiling of the statue to James Buchanan, fifteenth president. Unfortunately, the division of time with WBAL of Baltimore made it impossible for WTIC to act as it had in previous years as key station in broadcasting the annual Harvard-Yale regatta on the Thames over the national chain.
    During July, WTIC auditors heard a rebroadcast through the network of a concert by the Inverness Choir of Aberdeen in Scotland, and in August heard the eye-witness descriptions of the thrilling races on the Saratoga and Belmont tracks, in which the remarkable horse, Gallant Fox, demonstrated his superiority.
                        Fall   Programs.
    September opened with a memorable Labor Day program transmitted through the network. Frank Morrison, secretary of the American Federation of Labor, was the principal speaker. Also through the network, WTIC gave its listeners the eye-witness account of the reception to Coste and Bellonte, French transatlantic fliers, and daily descriptions of the American Cup Races, in which Sir Thomas Lipton’s “Shamrock V” lost to H. S. Vanderbilt’s “Enterprise.” Proceedings from the National Convention of Insurance Commissioners, which was held in Hartford, brought addresses by United States Senator Felix Hebert, Lieutenant Governor Ernest E. Rogers and Col. Howard P. Dunham, Connecticut’s insurance commissioner. James McCormack, brother of the illustrious John McCormack, having decided to utilize radio at the vehicle for his debut as a concert singer, gave a series of recitals from the WTIC studios. Seth Parker’s Old-fashioned Singing School which has been a weekly feature on The Travelers station for almost two years, went on a network of four other New England transmitters.
    During September, a series of programs was offered from the WTIC studios by Mike Hanapi and his “Ilema Islanders,” who proved so popular with the audience that they were signed up as permanent members of the staff. At the same time, WTIC added a new 13-piece dance combination, so that the permanent salaried musical staff now numbers 45 performers, the largest personnel maintained by any individual station. During the month, too, Moshe Paranov, able conductor and one of New England’s most brilliant concert pianists, was engaged as associate musical director, to collaborate with Musical Director Christiaan Kriens in the presentation of programs in the classic vein.
                    Features   Added.
    Two features devoted to the service of the WTIC audience were placed in the permanent schedule during September, the “Mixing Bowl” and the “Farm and Home Forum”. Florrie Bishop Bowering joined the WTIC staff to supervise the “Mixing Bowl”, a cooking school of the air, preparations for which included the building of a model electrical kitchen adjacent to the studios. The “Farm and Home Forum” is designed expressly for listeners interested in agriculture and is the result of collaborative efforts between the officials of the Connecticut State Department of Agricultural College and the WTIC staff.
    During October, WTIC was utilized by Democrats and Republicans in the election campaign. Both candidates for the governorship, Dean Wilbur Cross of Yale University, the victor, and Lieutenant Governor Ernest E. Rogers, the loser, addressed the WTIC audiences. Others who participated in the radio campaign were United State Senators, Hiram Bingham and Frederick C. Walcott, and Professor Charles M. Bakewell of Yale. From the network during October, WTIC offered three games of the World’s Series between the Philadelphia Athletics and St. Louis Cardinals; a speech from London by the Prince of Wales; General John J. Pershing’s address to the American Legion delegates assembled in Boston; the Army-Swarthmore, Army-Harvard and Harvard-Dartmouth football games.
    Important broadcasts relayed by WTIC in association with the network during November included two speeches by President Hoover, one of which was given on Armistice Day before the World Alliance for International Friendship and the other at the White House Child Health and Protection conference; the Navy Day program during which speeches were made by Secretary of the Navy Charles Francis Adams and Admiral William Veasie Pratt; an address in the interests of the Democratic campaign by Ex-governor Alfred E. Smith of New York; a concert by the Reid Orchestra in Edinburgh, Scotland; and football games between Pennsylvania and Notre Dame, Yale and Princeton, Yale and Harvard, and Cornell and Pennsylvania.
    The present month started off with the gridiron classic between Notre Dame and Southern California. The schedule for the remainder of December includes several special holiday features, with a coast-to-coast all-night broadcast to write a slap-bang “Finis” to the year.


The Hartford Daily Courant, Sunday, December 14, 1941,  pg.19
Travelers FM
 Station Will Go
     On Air Today
W53H to Broadcast Un-
    der Full Time License,
    Patricello Director

    W53H, The Travelers FM station, will go on the air tomorrow morning at 7 o’clock, under a full time license which permits the selling of radio time to commercial sponsors.
    The 7 o’clock opening will be observed six days weekly, Monday through Saturday. At 8 a.m., the station will sign off, returning to the air at three in the afternoon, when a complete and uninterrupted program will be maintained until nine in the evening. This program grouping will comprise music by the WTIC String Orchestra, news and sports compiled by the WTIC News Room, readings by Bernard Mullins from famous books, children’s features, with a wealth of symphonic music.
    W53H is the outgrowth of W1XSO. The latter has been in operation by The Travelers under an experimental license for two years. W1XSOm having fulfilled all of the requirements of the Federal Communications Commission, has now earned the right to sell time to sponsors under the call letters of W53H.
    The station’s director will be Leonard J. Patricelli, working in collaboration with WTIC’s Program Manager, Thomas C. McCray.
    Formal dedication of W53H will not take place until sometime in March, 1942, when its new antenna will have been placed in operation. The new tower, which is now in the course of construction, will be erected on a site adjacent to WTIC’s power plant on Avon Mountain. It will have a power output of approximately 6100 square miles or an area embracing a radius of 50 miles from Hartford.


Hartford Daily Courant, Friday, July 14, 1944, pg. 20

War Travel Talks Slated Over WTIC
General Somervell, La
  Guardia To Speak On
  Closed-Circuit Program
  July 17

WTIC will open its studios next Monday, July 17, at 1 p.m. for visitors interested in war time transportation. On that day Lieutenant General Grehon B. Somervell, commanding general of the Army Service Forces; Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, president of the U. S. Conference of Mayors and Col. J. Monroe Johnson, director of the Office of Defense Transportation, will participate in a closed circuit program over the NBC network. They will discuss “The Critical War Time Transportation Problem.”
General Somervell will outline transportation requirements of the military services including the handling of casualties. He will also discuss the accomplishments of the railroads since Pearl Harbor and the added burden that will be placed on facilities in coming months.
            LaGuardia  to  Report
    Mayor LaGuardia will report on the campaign sponsored by the Mayors’ Conference to popularize home vacations.
    Colonel Johnson will discuss the prospects of rationing travel and offer suggestions volunteer curtailment which can be fostered by local groups.
    All NBC affiliated stations have been asked to open their studios for guests interested in the problem. WTIC visitors will include municipal executives, officers of the Connecticut and Hartford Chambers of Commerce, representatives of the Manufacturers’ Association of Connecticut, labor official, merchants and industrialists who have a stake in the transportation problem.
    The primary purpose of the closed circuit talks is to stimulate community campaigns to support the national “Don’t Travel Campaign.” ODT representatives in more than 140 cities are expected to assist in promoting interest in the program in their respective localities.



WTIC Program Listings for February 1942

Monday-Friday

Daytime

  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:30 Romance of Helen Trent (NBC)
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:15 Medley Time
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)

Saturday

  8:00 News
  8:15 News
  8:30 Radio Bazaar; Program Parade
  9:00 Radio Bazaar
  9:15 Food News
  9:30 Hank Lawsen’s Knights of the Road (also WJAR)
10:00 Army Program
10:30 The Wife Saver (NBC)
11:00 Lincoln Highway (NBC)
11:30 Music While You Work
12:00 Here’s Washington
12:15 Theater Program
12:30 Farm Forum
  1:15 Markets; Agricultural News
  1:30 Varieties
  1:45 News (NBC)
  2:00 Marine Band (NBC)
  2:30 Matinee in Rhythm (NBC)
  3:00 Patty Chapin, songs (NBC)
  3:15 On the Home Front (NBC)
  3:30 Music for Everyone (NBC)
  4:00 News; Weekend Whimsy (NBC)
  4:30 Air Youth of America (NBC)
           Guest speakers: Casey Jones, World War No. 1 flyer.
  4:45 Melodic Strings (NBC)
  5:00 Doctors at Work (NBC)
  5:30 In a Sentimental Mood (NBC)
  5:45 Salon Music
  6:00 News; Weather
  6:15 Sports
  6:30 Come On & Dance
  6:45 Medical Talk
  7:00 This Week of War (NBC)
  7:30 Ellery Queen (NBC)
  8:00 Abie’s Irish Rose (NBC)
  8:30 Truth or Consequences (NBC)
            Ralph Edwards, m.c.
  9:00 Alka-Seltzer National Barn Dance (NBC)
            Eddie Peabody; Joe Kelly; Dinning Sisters; Hoosier Hot Shots; Others.
10:00 Sports Newsreel (NBC)
10:15 Ink Spots (NBC)
10:30 Hot Copy (NBC)


Sunday

  8:00 News (NBC)
  8:30 Gypsy Ensemble (NBC)
  9:00 European News (NBC)
  9:15 Deep River Boys (NBC)
  9:30 Words & Music (NBC)
10:00 Nat’l. Radio Pulpit (NBC)
10:30 Thrilling Stories of America (NBC)
10:45 Vi & Vilma, songs (NBC)
11:00 News
11:15 Day Dreams
11:30 Music & American Youth
    Music by the Delaware All State High School Band and the U. of Delaware Choir. Direction of
  Lenard Quinto.
    Minuet from String Quartette in C major.....Haydn
    Fire, Fire My Heart......................Morley-Wiseman
    Minuet......................................Boccherin-Rissland
    Iolanthe.......................................................Sullivan
    America..................................................Carey Orth
    Lord’s Prayer..............................................Mallotte

12:00 Musical Souvenirs
12:15 Junior Quiz
12:45 News
  1:00 Upton Close, news (NBC)
  1:15  Silver Strings (NBC)
  1:30 The World Is Yours (NBC)
  2:00 Sammy Kaye’s Orchestra (NBC)
  2:30 University of Chicago Round Table Discussion (NBC)
  2:45 Sabbath Talk
  3:00 Bob Becker’s Chats About  Dogs (NBC)
  3:15 H.V. Kaltenborn, comm. (NBC)
  3:30 Listen, America (NBC)
  4:00 Sylvia Marlowe & Richard Dyer-Bennett (also WEAF/NBC)
  4:15 Heirs of Liberty
  4:30 Heirs of Liberty
  5:00 Metropolitan Auditions of the Air (NBC)
            Wilfred Pelletier’s Orchestra; Guests.
  5:30 Nichols Family of Five (NBC)
  6:00 News
  6:15 Sports
  6:30 News
  6:45 Flufferettes (with WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG – possibly a Yankee Network feature)
  7:00 Jack Benny, comedian (NBC)
            with Mary Livingstone; Eddie “Rochester” Anderson; Dennis Day; Phil Harris’ Orch.; Don Wilson.
  7:30 Fitch Bandwagon; Toby Reed, m.c.; Guest Orch. (NBC)
  8:00 Chase & Sanborn Prgm.; Edgar Bergen; Charlie McCarthy; Abbott & Costello; Ray Noble’s Orch.; Guests.
            (NBC)
  8:30 One Man’s Family (NBC)
  9:00 Manhattan Merry-Go-Round (NBC)
            Conrad Thibault; Chorus; Girls of Manhattan; Men About Town Trio; Victor Arden’s Orch.
  9:30 Album of Familiar Music (NBC)
            Frank Munn; Vivian Della Chiesa, sop.; Jean Dickerson; Gus Haenschen’s Orch.
10:00 Hour of Charm; Phil Spitalny’s All-Girl Orch. (NBC)
            Richard Stark, m.c.
10:30 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (NBC)
11:00 News
11:15 Story Behind the Headlines (NBC)
11:30 Three Sheets in the Wind (NBC)
    Beginning a new mystery-comedy series, written by Tay Garnett, motion picture director, and starring
          John Wayne and Helga Moray.


Saturday, February 7

  8:00 News
  8:15 News
  8:30 Radio Bazaar; Program Parade
  9:00 Radio Bazaar
  9:15 Food News
  9:30 Hank Lawsen’s Knights of the Road (also WJAR)
10:00 Army Program
10:30 The Wife Saver (NBC)
11:00 Lincoln Highway (NBC) Guests: Peggy Wood and Vincent Price.
11:30 Music While You Work
12:00 Here’s Washington
12:15 Theater Program
12:30 Farm Forum
  1:15 Markets; Agricultural News
  1:30 Varieties
  1:45 News (NBC)
  2:00 Marine Band (NBC)
  2:30 Dance Orchestra (NBC)
  3:00 Patty Chapin, songs (NBC)
  3:15 On the Home Front (NBC)
  3:30 Music for Everyone (NBC)
  4:00 News; Weekend Whimsy (NBC)
  4:30 Air Youth of America (NBC)
           Guest speakers: Gill Robb Wilson, president of N. A. A.
  4:45 Melodic Strings (NBC)
  5:00 Doctors at Work (NBC)
  5:30 In a Sentimental Mood (NBC)
  5:45 Salon Music

Evening
  6:00 News; Weather
  6:15 Sports
  6:30 Come On & Dance
  6:45 Medical Talk
  7:00 This Week of War (NBC)
  7:30 Ellery Queen (NBC)
  8:00 Abie’s Irish Rose (NBC)
  8:30 Truth or Consequences (NBC)
            Ralph Edwards, m.c.
  9:00 Alka-Seltzer National Barn Dance (NBC)
            Eddie Peabody; Joe Kelly; Dinning Sisters; Hoosier Hot Shots; Others.
10:00 Sports Newsreel (NBC)
10:15 Vagabonds (NBC)
10:30 Hot Copy (NBC)
11:00 News
11:15 Olmsted’s Story Dramas (NBC)
11:30 Riverboat Revels (NBC)
12:00 News; Music of the Americas (NBC)

Sunday, February 8
  8:00 News; Dr. Chas. M. Courboin (NBC)
  8:30 Gypsy Ensemble (NBC)
  9:00 European News (NBC)
  9:15 Deep River Boys (NBC)
  9:30 Words & Music (NBC)
10:00 Nat’l. Radio Pulpit (NBC)
10:30 Thrilling Stories of America (NBC)
10:45 Vi & Vilma, songs (NBC)
11:00 News
11:15 Day Dreams
11:30 Music & American Youth

Afternoon
12:00 Musical Souvenirs
12:15 Junior Quiz Show
12:45 News
  1:00 Upton Close, news (NBC)
  1:15  Silver Strings (NBC)
  1:30 The World Is Yours (NBC)
  2:00 Sammy Kaye’s Orchestra (NBC)
  2:30 Curtiss Ensemble
  2:45 Sabbath Talk
  3:00 Bob Becker’s Chats About  Dogs (NBC)
  3:15 H.V. Kaltenborn, comm. (NBC)
  3:30 Listen, America (NBC)
    This country’s outstanding men and women scientists talk on vital new discoveries dealing with the United
              States food problems. Guest stars from stage, screen and radio will be presented.
  4:00 Musical Brazil (NBC)
  4:15 Heirs of Liberty
  4:30 Heirs of Liberty
  5:00 Metropolitan Auditions of the Air (NBC)
            Wilfred Pelletier’s Orchestra; Guests.
  5:30 Nichols Family of Five (NBC)
Evening
  6:00 News
  6:15 Sports
  6:30 News
  6:45 Flufferettes (with WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG – possibly a Yankee Network feature)
  7:00 Jack Benny, comedian (NBC)
            with Mary Livingstone; Eddie “Rochester” Anderson; Dennis Day; Phil Harris’ Orch.; Don Wilson.
  7:30 Fitch Bandwagon; Toby Reed, m.c.; Guest: Orrin Tucker Orch. (NBC)
  8:00 Chase & Sanborn Prgm.; Edgar Bergen; Charlie McCarthy; Abbott & Costello; Ray Noble’s Orch.; Guests.
            (NBC)
  8:30 One Man’s Family (NBC)
  9:00 Manhattan Merry-Go-Round (NBC)
            Conrad Thibault; Chorus; Girls of Manhattan; Men About Town Trio; Victor Arden’s Orch.
  9:30 Album of Familiar Music (NBC)
            Frank Munn; Vivian Della Chiesa, sop.; Jean Dickenson; Gus Haenschen’s Orch.
10:00 Hour of Charm; Phil Spitalny’s All-Girl Orch. (NBC)
            Richard Stark, m.c.
10:30 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (NBC)
11:00 News
11:15 Story Behind the Headlines (NBC)
11:30 Three Sheets in the Wind (NBC)
    Beginning a new mystery-comedy series, starring John Wayne, movie star, and Helga Moray, English actress.
12:00 News; Francis Craig’s Orch. (NBC)

Monday, February 9
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Radio Bazaar
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 Luncheonaires
12:30 Day Dreams
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 Women of Connecticut
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Concert Matinee; News
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45 Music; Stand by America

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Professor Andre Schenker
  6:30 Jack Says, Ask Me Another
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Cavalcade of America (NBC)
            Don Voorhees Orch.  Tonight’s presentation, “Abe Lincoln and The War Years,” starring Raymond Massey.
  8:00 Telephone Hour (NBC)
             James Melton; Francia White, soprano; Mixed Chorus (The Bell Chorus); Don Voorhees & Symphony Orch.
      I Love Life......Mana-Zucca
      In Deep Woods from “New England Idyls”.....MacDowell
      Springtime of Love.....Moszkowski
      Abe Lincoln Had Just One Country......Kern
      Hora Staccato.....Dinieu-Heifetz
      Recondita Armonia  from “Tosca” .....Puccini
       Because You’re You  from “The Red Mill”.....Herbert
     NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Don Voorhees
  8:30 Voice of Firestone (NBC)
               Richard Crooks, tnr.; Concert Orch.
       Raymond Overture.....Thomas
       I Love Thee.....Grieg
       Irish Time from County Derry.....Grainger
       Absent.....Metcalf
       Tell Me Tonight.....Spolinsky
       Morning Journals.....Strauss
       Elegie.....Massenet
  9:00 Doctor I.Q., Jim McClain (NBC)
  9:30 That Brewster Boy (NBC)
10:00 Contented Hour (NBC)
      Evelyn Ames; Chorus & Orch.,; Dir. by Percy Faith.
10:30 Waltz Serenade
11:00 News
11:30 Ink Spots (NBC)
11:45 Beasley Smith’s Orchestra (NBC)
12:00 News; Freddy Ebener’s Orch. (NBC)
  1:00  News and sign off...I presume – or maybe, segue-way serenade till 6 or so? <G>


Tuesday, February 10
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Playhouse
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 Luncheonaires
12:30 Romance of Helen Trent (NBC)
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 Wrightville Sketches
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Styled for Strings; News
  2:45  do.
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45 Musicale

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Sports
  6:30 Patti Chapin, songs. (also WEAF)
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Burns & Allen (NBC)
    Paul Whiteman’s Orch. Senor Lee & Jimmy Cash.
  8:00 Johnny Presents: Tallulah Bankhead; Swing Fourteen; Ray Block’s Orch. (NBC)
  8:30 Horace Heidt’s Treasure Chest (NBC)
  9:00 Battle of the Sexes (NBC) Frank Crumit & Julia Sanderson
  9:30 Fibber McGee & Molly (NBC) Jim & Marian Jordan; Martha Tilton
10:00 Bob Hope Variety Show (NBC). Frances Langford, Jerry Colonna, Skinnay Ennis’ Orch.
10:30 Red Skelton; (NBC). Ozzie Nelson’s Orch., Harriet Hilliard, Truman Bradley, Wonderful Smith.
11:00 News
11:15 Bruce Fahnestock
11:30 Polish Orch.
12:00 Roy Shield & Co. (NBC)


Wednesday, February 11
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Playhouse
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 News
12:30 Day Dreams
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 How to Enter a Contest & Win
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Medical Talk; Mile o’ Dimes; News
  2:45  do.
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45 Laura C. Gaudet, pianist; Stand by America

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Professor Andre Schenker
  6:30 Musical Appetizer
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Connecticut Forum
  8:00 Adventures of the Thin Man, drama. (NBC)
  8:30 Uncle Walter’s Dog House (NBC)
  9:00 Time to Smile; Eddie Cantor (NBC)
            Dinah Shore; Bert (Mad Russian) Gordon; Edgar Fairchild’s Orch. Guest: Brian Aherne, screen star.
  9:30 Mr. District Attorney (NBC)
10:00 Kay Kyser’s Prgm. (NBC)
            Harry Babbitt; Sully Mason.
10:30   do.
11:00 News
11:15 Three Romeos ?
11:30 Author’s Playhouse (NBC)
12:00 News; Freddy Ebener’s Orch.

Thursday, February 12
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Playhouse
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 Luncheonaires
12:30 Romance of Helen Trent (NBC)
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 Wrightville Sketches
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Concert Miniatures
  2:45 Three Debs; News.
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45 Musicale

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Strictly Sports (with Bob Steele, of course!)
  6:30 Salon Orch.
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Al Pearce’s Gang (NBC)
  8:00 Maxwell House Coffee Time (NBC)
            Fanny Brice; Hanley Stafford; John Conte; Frank Morgan; Meredith Wilson’s Orch.
  8:30  Aldrich Family (NBC)
  9:00  Kraft Music Hall (NBC)
    Bing Crosby; m.c.; Mary Martin, sop.; Jerry Lester; Victor Borge; Music Maids; Johnny Trotter’s Orch.
  9:30   do
10:00  Sealtest Rudy Vallee Program (NBC)
             John Barrymore; Joan Davis. Jane Withers, guest star, joins the rest of the cast in broadcasting from Long
           Beach Naval Air Reserve Base in Long Beach, California.
10:30 Frank Fay (NBC)
            Bob Hannon; Beverly & Her Boy Friends; Harry Salter’s Orch,; Guests
11:00 News
11:15 Dance Music
11:30 Joe & Mabel (NBC)
12:00  News; Freddie Ebener’s Orch. (NBC)



Friday, February 13
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Playhouse
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 News
12:30 Romance of Helen Trent (NBC)
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 Your Neighbor
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Concert Matinee; News
  2:45   do
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45 Musicale

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Professor Andre Schenker
  6:30 Musical Appetizer
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Grand Central Station (NBC)
  8:00 Cities Service Concert (NBC)
       Lucille Manners; Ross Graham; Frank Black, cond.
  8:30 Information Please (NBC)
     Clifton Fadiman, m.c.; John Kieran; F.P. Adams; Guests
  9:00 Waltz Time (NBC)
    Frank Munn; Chorus; Abe Lyman’s Orch.
  9:30 Uncle Walter’s Dog House (NBC)
            Tom Wallace; Mary Ann Mercer; Bob Strong’s Orchestra
10:00 Wings of Destiny (NBC)
10:30 The Night of Feb. 13th (NBC)
11:00 News
11:15 Vagabonds (NBC)
11:30 Unlimited Horizons (NBC)
     Subject: “Plant Life Before History Began”
12:00 News; Southern Rivers (NBC)


W53H
45.3 Megs  Hartford, Conn.


  3:00
  3:30
  3:45
  4:00
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  5:45
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  6:15
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  7:15
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  9:00



Saturday
  3:00 News; Pop Concert
  3:30 Music for Everyone
  3:45  do
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Gaslight Harmonies
  6:45 Medical Talk
  7:00 News
  7:15 Pan Americana
  7:30  do
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Sunday
  3:00 News; Piano Duo
  3:15 H.V. Kaltenborn (NBC)
  3:30 Hymns & Readings
  3:45   do
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45   do
  5:00 News; Melody Trio
  5:15 Lest We Forget
  5:30 Songs of the Heart
  6:00 News; Background for Dinner
  6:15   do
  6:30 A Box at the Opera
  6:45   do
  7:00 News
  7:15 String Quartet
  7:30 Hymn Singer
  7:45 Yale Interprets the News
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Monday
  3:00 News; Pop Concert
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45 Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Voices In Song
  6:45 Modern Melody Trio
  7:00 News
  7:15 Little Concert
  7:30 Sweet Swing
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Tuesday
  3:00 News; Concert Miniatures
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45 Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Patti Chapin, songs
  6:45 Diminutive Classics
  7:00 News
  7:15 Salute to Latin American
  7:30   do
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Wednesday
  3:00 News; Pop Concert
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45 Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Voices in Song
  6:45 Piano Classics
  7:00 News
  7:15 Let’s Waltz
  7:30 String Serenade
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Thursday
  3:00 News; They liked Me Too Much
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45  Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Gaslight Harmonies
  6:45 Diminutive Classics
  7:00 News
  7:15 Sweet Swing
  7:30   do
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Friday
  3:00 News; Hawaiian Music
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45 Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Voices in Song
  6:45 Guest Artist Series
  7:00 News
  7:15 String Serenade
  7:30   do
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News




Saturday, February 14

  8:00 News
  8:15 News
  8:30 Radio Bazaar; Program Parade
  9:00 Radio Bazaar
  9:15 Food News
  9:30 Hank Lawsen’s Knights of the Road (also WJAR)
10:00 Army Program
10:30 The Wife Saver (NBC)
11:00 Lincoln Highway (NBC)
11:30 Music While You Work
12:00 Here’s Washington
12:15 Theater Program
12:30 Farm Forum
  1:15 Markets; Agricultural News
  1:30 Varieties
  1:45 News (NBC)
  2:00 Marine Band (NBC)
  2:30 Matinee in Rhythm (NBC)
  3:00 Patty Chapin, songs (NBC)
  3:15 On the Home Front (NBC)
  3:30 Music for Everyone (NBC)
  4:00 News; Weekend Whimsy (NBC)
  4:30 Air Youth of America (NBC)
           Guest speakers: Casey Jones, World War No. 1 flyer.
  4:45 Melodic Strings (NBC)
  5:00 Doctors at Work (NBC)
  5:30 In a Sentimental Mood (NBC)
  5:45 Salon Music
  6:00 News; Weather
  6:15 Sports
  6:30 Come On & Dance
  6:45 Medical Talk
  7:00 This Week of War (NBC)
  7:30 Ellery Queen (NBC)
  8:00 Abie’s Irish Rose (NBC)
  8:30 Truth or Consequences (NBC)
            Ralph Edwards, m.c.
  9:00 Alka-Seltzer National Barn Dance (NBC)
            Eddie Peabody; Joe Kelly; Dinning Sisters; Hoosier Hot Shots; Others.
10:00 Sports Newsreel (NBC)
10:15 Ink Spots (NBC)
10:30 Hot Copy (NBC)
Sunday, February 15

  8:00 News (NBC)
  8:30 Gypsy Ensemble (NBC)
  9:00 European News (NBC)
  9:15 Deep River Boys (NBC)
  9:30 Words & Music (NBC)
10:00 Nat’l. Radio Pulpit (NBC)
10:30 Thrilling Stories of America (NBC)
10:45 Vi & Vilma, songs (NBC)
11:00 News
11:15 Day Dreams
11:30 Music & American Youth
    Music by the Delaware All State High School Band and the U. of Delaware Choir. Direction of
  Lenard Quinto.
    Minuet from String Quartette in C major.....Haydn
    Fire, Fire My Heart......................Morley-Wiseman
    Minuet......................................Boccherin-Rissland
    Iolanthe.......................................................Sullivan
    America..................................................Carey Orth
    Lord’s Prayer..............................................Mallotte

12:00 Musical Souvenirs
12:15 Junior Quiz
12:45 News
  1:00 Upton Close, news (NBC)
  1:15  Silver Strings (NBC)
  1:30 The World Is Yours (NBC)
  2:00 Sammy Kaye’s Orchestra (NBC)
  2:30 University of Chicago Round Table Discussion (NBC)
  2:45 Sabbath Talk
  3:00 Bob Becker’s Chats About  Dogs (NBC)
  3:15 H.V. Kaltenborn, comm. (NBC)
  3:30 Listen, America (NBC)
  4:00 Sylvia Marlowe & Richard Dyer-Bennett (also WEAF/NBC)
  4:15 Heirs of Liberty
  4:30 Heirs of Liberty
  5:00 Metropolitan Auditions of the Air (NBC)
            Wilfred Pelletier’s Orchestra; Guests.
  5:30 Nichols Family of Five (NBC)
  6:00 News
  6:15 Sports
  6:30 News
  6:45 Flufferettes (with WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG – possibly a Yankee Network feature)
  7:00 Jack Benny, comedian (NBC)
            with Mary Livingstone; Eddie “Rochester” Anderson; Dennis Day; Phil Harris’ Orch.; Don Wilson.
  7:30 Fitch Bandwagon; Toby Reed, m.c.; Guest Orch. (NBC)
  8:00 Chase & Sanborn Prgm.; Edgar Bergen; Charlie McCarthy; Abbott & Costello; Ray Noble’s Orch.; Guests.
            (NBC)
  8:30 One Man’s Family (NBC)
  9:00 Manhattan Merry-Go-Round (NBC)
            Conrad Thibault; Chorus; Girls of Manhattan; Men About Town Trio; Victor Arden’s Orch.
  9:30 Album of Familiar Music (NBC)
            Frank Munn; Vivian Della Chiesa, sop.; Jean Dickerson; Gus Haenschen’s Orch.
10:00 Hour of Charm; Phil Spitalny’s All-Girl Orch. (NBC)
            Richard Stark, m.c.
10:30 Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (NBC)
11:00 News
11:15 Story Behind the Headlines (NBC)
11:30 Three Sheets in the Wind (NBC)
    Beginning a new mystery-comedy series, written by Tay Garnett, motion picture director, and starring
          John Wayne and Helga Moray.





Monday, February 16
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Radio Bazaar
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 Luncheonaires
12:30 Romance of Helen Trent (NBC)
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 Women of Connecticut
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Concert Matinee; News
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Professor Andre Schenker
  6:30 Studio Prgm.
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Cavalcade of America (NBC)
            Don Voorhees Orch.  Tonight’s presentation, “Dark Angel,” starring Merle Oberon.
  8:00 Telephone Hour (NBC)
             James Melton; Francia White, soprano; Mixed Chorus (The Bell Chorus); Don Voorhees & Symphony Orch.

    Danza, Danza, Fanciulla Gentille.........Durante
    Internezzo to Act III, from “Jewels of the Madonna.....Wolf-Ferrari
    Pale Moon........Logan
    Serenade, from “The Student Prince”.......Romberg
    Rakoczy March.....Liszt
    Just a Wearyin’ for You.....Bond
    You Are Love, from “Show Boat”.....Kern
     NBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Don Voorhees
  8:30 Voice of Firestone (NBC)
              Margaret Speaks, sop.; Concert Orch.
  9:00 Doctor I.Q., Jim McClain (NBC)
  9:30 That Brewster Boy (NBC)
10:00 Contented Hour (NBC)
      Chorus & Orch.,; Dir. by Percy Faith.
10:30 Waltz Serenade
11:00 News
11:30 Ink Spots (NBC)
11:45 Beasley Smith’s Orchestra (NBC)
12:00 News; Freddy Ebener’s Orch. (NBC)
  1:00  News and sign off...I presume – or maybe, segue-way serenade till 6 or so? <G>


Tuesday, February 17
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Playhouse
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 Luncheonaires
12:30 Romance of Helen Trent (NBC)
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 Wrightville Sketches
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Styled for Strings; News
  2:45  do.
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45 Musicale

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Sports
  6:30 Patti Chapin, songs. (also WEAF)
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Burns & Allen (NBC)
    Paul Whiteman’s Orch. Senor Lee & Jimmy Cash.
  8:00 Johnny Presents: Tallulah Bankhead; Swing Fourteen; Ray Block’s Orch. (NBC)
  8:30 Horace Heidt’s Treasure Chest (NBC)
  9:00 Battle of the Sexes (NBC) Frank Crumit & Julia Sanderson
  9:30 Fibber McGee & Molly (NBC) Jim & Marian Jordan; Martha Tilton
10:00 Bob Hope Variety Show (NBC). Frances Langford, Jerry Colonna, Skinnay Ennis’ Orch.
10:30 Red Skelton; (NBC). Ozzie Nelson’s Orch., Harriet Hilliard, Truman Bradley, Wonderful Smith.
11:00 News
11:15 Bruce Fahnestock
11:30 Polish Orch.
12:00 Roy Shield & Co. (NBC)


Wednesday, February 18
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Playhouse
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 News
12:30 Romance of Helen Trent (NBC)
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 How to Enter a Contest & Win
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Medical Talk; Mile o’ Dimes; News
  2:45  do.
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45 Laura C. Gaudet, pianist; Stand by America

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Professor Andre Schenker
  6:30 Musical Appetizer
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Come On & Dance
  8:00 Adventures of the Thin Man, drama. (NBC)
  8:30 Uncle Walter’s Dog House (NBC)
  9:00 Time to Smile; Eddie Cantor (NBC)
            Dinah Shore; Bert (Mad Russian) Gordon; Edgar Fairchild’s Orch. Guest: Brian Aherne, screen star.
  9:30 Mr. District Attorney (NBC)
10:00 Kay Kyser’s Prgm. (NBC)
            Harry Babbitt; Sully Mason.
10:30   do.
11:00 News
11:15 Three Romeos
11:30 When Day Is Done
12:00 News; Freddy Ebener’s Orch.

Thursday, February 19
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Playhouse
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 Luncheonaires
12:30 Romance of Helen Trent (NBC)
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 Wrightville Sketches
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Concert Miniatures
  2:45 Three Debs; News.
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45 Musicale

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Strictly Sports (with Bob Steele, of course!)
  6:30 Salon Orch.
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Al Pearce’s Gang (NBC)
  8:00 Maxwell House Coffee Time (NBC)
            Fanny Brice; Hanley Stafford; John Conte; Frank Morgan; Meredith Wilson’s Orch.
  8:30  Aldrich Family (NBC)
  9:00  Kraft Music Hall (NBC)
    Bing Crosby; m.c.; Mary Martin, sop.; Jerry Lester; Victor Borge; Music Maids; Johnny Trotter’s Orch.
  9:30   do
10:00  Sealtest Rudy Vallee Program (NBC)
             John Barrymore; Joan Davis.
10:30 Frank Fay (NBC)
            Bob Hannon; Beverly & Her Boy Friends; Harry Salter’s Orch,; Guests
11:00 News
11:15 Dance Music
11:30 Joe & Mabel (NBC)
12:00  News; Freddie Ebener’s Orch. (NBC)



Friday, February 20
  8:00 Morning Watch
  9:00 Playhouse
  9:15 Food News (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  9:30 Aunt Jenny’s Stories
  9:45 As the Twig Is Bent
10:00 Story of Bess Johnson (NBC)
10:15 Bachelor’s Children (NBC)
10:30 Helpmate (NBC)
10:45 Road of Life (NBC)
11:00 Story of Mary Marlin (NBC)
11:15 Right to Happiness (NBC)
11:30 The Bartons (NBC)
11:45 David Harum (NBC)
12:00 Gene & Glenn (also WTAG)
12:15 News
12:30 Romance of Helen Trent (NBC)
12:45 Singin’ Sam (also WTAG)
  1:00 News
  1:15 Little Show
  1:30 Marjorie Mills (also WNAC, WEAN, WICC, WTAG)
  2:00 Your Neighbor
  2:15 Medley Time
  2:30 Concert Matinee; News
  2:45   do
  3:00 Against the Storm (NBC)
  3:15 Ma Perkins (NBC)
  3:30 Pepper Young’s Family (NBC)
  3:45 Vic & Sade (NBC)
  4:00 Backstage Wife (NBC)
  4:15 Stella Dallas (NBC)
  4:30 Lorenzo Jones (NBC)
  4:45 Young Widder Brown (NBC)
  5:00 When a Girl Marries (NBC)
  5:15 Portia Faces Life (NBC)
  5:30 We, the Abbotts (NBC)
  5:45 Musicale

 Evening

  6:00 News
  6:15 Professor Andre Schenker
  6:30 Musical Appetizer
  6:45 Lowell Thomas, comm. (NBC)
  7:00 Fred Waring in Pleasure Time (NBC)
  7:15 News of the World (NBC)
  7:30 Grand Central Station (NBC)
  8:00 Cities Service Concert (NBC)
       Lucille Manners; Ross Graham; Frank Black, cond.
  8:30 Information Please (NBC)
     Clifton Fadiman, m.c.; John Kieran; F.P. Adams; Guests
  9:00 Waltz Time (NBC)
    Frank Munn; Chorus; Abe Lyman’s Orch.
  9:30 Plantation Party (NBC)
10:00 Captain Flagg & Sgt. Quirt (NBC)
10:30 The Night of Feb. 20th (NBC)
11:00 News
11:15 Vagabonds (NBC)
11:30 Unlimited Horizons (NBC)
     Subject: “Muddy Waters”
12:00 News; Southern Rivers (NBC)


W53H
45.3 Megs  Hartford, Conn.


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  4:00
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Saturday
  3:00 News; Pop Concert
  3:30 Music for Everyone
  3:45  do
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Gaslight Harmonies
  6:45 Medical Talk
  7:00 News
  7:15 Pan Americana
  7:30  do
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Sunday
  3:00 News; Piano Duo
  3:15 H.V. Kaltenborn (NBC)
  3:30 Hymns & Readings
  3:45   do
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45   do
  5:00 News; Melody Trio
  5:15 Lest We Forget
  5:30 Songs of the Heart
  6:00 News; Background for Dinner
  6:15   do
  6:30 A Box at the Opera
  6:45   do
  7:00 News
  7:15 String Quartet
  7:30 Hymn Singer
  7:45 Yale Interprets the News
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Monday
  3:00 News; Pop Concert
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45 Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Voices In Song
  6:45 Modern Melody Trio
  7:00 News
  7:15 Little Concert
  7:30 Sweet Swing
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Tuesday
  3:00 News; Concert Miniatures
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45 Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Patti Chapin, songs
  6:45 Diminutive Classics
  7:00 News
  7:15 Salute to Latin American
  7:30   do
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Wednesday
  3:00 News; Pop Concert
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45 Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Voices in Song
  6:45 Piano Classics
  7:00 News
  7:15 Let’s Waltz
  7:30 Fireside Quartet
  7:45 Your Part in Civilian Defense
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Thursday
  3:00 News; Pop Concert
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45  Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Gaslight Harmonies
  6:45 Diminutive Classics
  7:00 News
  7:15 Sweet Swing
  7:30   do
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

Friday
  3:00 News; Pop Concert
  3:30 Welcome to FM
  3:45 Musical Punchboard
  4:00 News; Symphonic Matinee
  4:45 Library of the Air
  5:00 News; Sunset Hour
  5:45 Children’s Hour
  6:00 News; Sports
  6:15 Background for Dinner
  6:30 Voices in Song
  6:45 Guest Artist Series
  7:00 News
  7:15 String Serenade
  7:30   do
  7:45 Between the Lines
  8:00 News; Symphony Hour
  9:00 News

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